Discovering Democracy Units
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A Democracy Destroyed

National, state and territory curriculum links

National | ACT | NSW | NT | QLD | SA | TAS | VIC | WA

National

The nationally developed Statements of Learning for Civics and Citizenship includes three ‘Aspects’ that are defined at four levels of schooling (ie Year 3, 5, 7 and 9). The Year 9 Statements of Learning relate to the Discovering Democracy unit, ‘Human Rights’.

Year 9

Government and law

  • Students explore principles, features and practices that characterise democracy in Australia (eg how Australia’s system of government is similar to or different from other democracies).

Citizenship in a democracy

  • Students evaluate Australia’s pluralist society and explore the responsibilities of young adults in contributing towards a socially cohesive, democratic community (eg whether Australia balances majority rule with respect for minorities in civil decision making).

Historical perspectives

  • Students explore how and why civic and political rights, government policies and national identity have changed over time in Australia (eg Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders’ pursuit of citizenship rights and democratic representation; people, movements and events that have enhanced civil and political rights for specific groups of Australians).

Australian Capital Territory

The Every chance to learn: Curriculum framework for ACT schools has essential content within the later adolescence band relevant to the Discovering Democracy unit, ‘Human Rights’.

Later adolescence band

ELA 21 The student understands about Australia and Australians.

History

  • 21.LA.2 How government policies have affected Indigenous peoples and their pursuit of citizenship rights.

Contemporary society

  • 21.LA.5 Contemporary and future challenges facing Australian society.


ELA 22 The student understands and values what it means to be a citizen in a democracy.

Democratic features

  • 22.LA.4 The Australian constitution as the legal framework for Australia’s system of law and government.

Democratic principles

  • 22.LA.8 How majority rule is balanced with respect for minorities in the exercise of democratic power and civic decision-making.

Active citizenship

  • 22.LA.11 People, movements and events that have led to civil and political rights for specific groups of Australians (eg human rights and equal opportunity policies).


ELA 23 The student understands world events and issues.

Events and issues

  • 23.LA.1 Significant world movements and conflicts in the 20th and 21st centuries (eg civil rights) and the key people who shaped events.
  • 23.LA.3 The role of international agreements and organisations in protecting human rights.

New South Wales

Learning outcomes within Stage 5 of the History 7–10 Syllabus and the Aboriginal Studies 7–10 Syllabus are relevant to the Discovering Democracy unit, ‘Human Rights’.

Stage 5

History

Civics and Citizenship is a key focus of the syllabus (eg key features of the constitution; constitutional changes since Federation; changing rights and freedoms of various groups).

  • 5.1 Explains social, political and cultural developments and events and evaluates their impact on Australian life (eg Indigenous rights: 1967 Referendum; Land Rights and Native Title).
  • 5.2 Assesses the impact of international events and relationships on Australia’s history (eg UN conventions).
  • 5.3 Explains the changing rights and freedoms of Aboriginal peoples and other groups in Australia (eg voting rights at Federation; changing government policies towards Aboriginal peoples over time).
  • 5.5 Identifies, comprehends and evaluates historical sources (eg the main features of the Australian constitution).
  • LS.4 Explores significant developments in world social and cultural history (eg revolutionary Europe).
  • LS.5 Investigates significant people, events and issues in world history (eg revolutionary Europe).
  • LS.8 Investigates significant people, events and issues in Australian history (eg Indigenous rights: changing rights and freedoms of Aboriginal people post-1945 such as the 1967 Referendum, recognition of land rights and Native Title).

Aboriginal Studies

  • 5.6 Explains the importance of self-determination and autonomy to all aspects of Aboriginal peoples’ participation nationally and internationally (eg human rights, self-determination and autonomy, including social justice and equity).
  • 5.8 Analyses the interaction of the wider Australian community with Aboriginal peoples and cultures (eg the effects of dispossession, massacres and genocide; impact of demands for self determination and autonomy by Aboriginal peoples on the broader Australian community).
  • LS.4 A student recognises the importance of self-determination and autonomy for Aboriginal peoples.

Northern Territory

Student learning outcomes within Band 5 and Beyond Band 5 of the Studies of Society and Environment Learning Area of the Northern Territory Curriculum Framework are relevant to the Discovering Democracy unit, ‘Human Rights’.

Band 5

Social Systems and Structures

Time, Continuity and Change

  • Soc 5.1 Analyse how past forces and events have shaped contemporary communities (eg Australia’s changing relationship with international organisations).

Indigenous Studies

  • Soc 5.2 Analyse and evaluate complex, culturally based social, environmental and political issues that are significant to Indigenous peoples (eg common themes in the histories, cultures and concerns of Australian Indigenous groups).

Civics, Governance and Social Justice

  • Soc 5.3 Critically evaluate a range of political and legal systems and their impact on citizens; analyse the moral/ethical codes of organisations that promote and protect human rights (eg the Australian constitution; movements for civil and political rights of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities).

Beyond Band 5

Social Systems and Structures

Indigenous Studies

  • Soc 5+.2 Analyse and describe the interrelationships between Indigenous kinship/relationships and the land/environment, and compare and contrast this with other cultural world views, in collaboration with Indigenous people (eg land rights; how self-management is important to Indigenous people).

Civics, Governance and Social Justice

  • Soc 5+.3 Critically evaluate how political and legal systems impact on civic actions and the implications for those who attempt political and legal reform; analyse and interpret the moral and ethical codes of organisations, individuals and societies in terms of social justice (eg the circumstances behind specific examples of racism and discrimination; an Australian Bill of Rights).

Queensland

Student learning outcomes within Level 6 and Beyond Level 6 of the Studies of Society and Environment Years 1 to 10 Syllabus are relevant to the Discovering Democracy unit, ‘Human Rights’.

Level 6

Time, Continuity and Change

  • TCC 6.1 Students evaluate evidence from the past to demonstrate how such accounts reflect the culture in which they were created (eg European and Indigenous views of Australian events).
  • TCC 6.3 Students collaboratively identify the values underlying contributions by diverse individuals and groups in Australian environments (eg social justice, human rights).
  • TCC D6.7 Students explain various groups’ perspectives on the values of peace and social justice.

Culture and Identity

  • CI 6.4 Students describe instances of cultural change resulting from government legislation or policies that have impacted on cultural groups (eg Racial Discrimination Act 1975; Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission).

Beyond Level 6

Time, Continuity and Change

  • D6.1 Students evaluate the ways in which their personal histories and the histories of others have been constructed.
  • D6.4 Students evaluate progressive actions from the past to recommend particular actions for the future.

Culture and Identity

  • D6.4 Students develop socially just scenarios about preferred changes to Australian cultures, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures.

Systems, Resources and Power

  • D6.4 Students propose changes to economic, political or legal systems to make them more democratic and socially just.

South Australia

Standards 4 and 5 in Society and Environment of the South Australian Curriculum Standards and Accountability Framework are relevant to the Discovering Democracy unit, ‘Human Rights’.

Standard 4

Societies and cultures

  • 4.8 Demonstrates critical understanding of their own cultural practices in comparison to the histories, cultures and present-day experience of rural and urban Aboriginal groups (eg the effects of colonisation and repressive laws).
  • 4.9 Researches and engages with others to enhance ethical behaviour in relation to the human rights of individuals and groups within and across groups, cultures and countries (eg human rights in different contexts; the role of an agencies or advocates who aim to protect the rights of individuals).

Social systems

  • 4.10 Analyses differences between political, legal and social systems and people’s rights and responsibilities (eg political rights such as free speech).

Standard 5

Time, continuity and change

  • 5.1 Critically analyses different interpretations of events, ideas and issues, including an understanding of the relationship between power and historical representation (eg the identity of Australia as it has reflected or ignored various Indigenous groups over time).
  • 5.3 Explains and justifies a position on continuing and changing aspects of societies, including underlying values, ways to influence the future, and how these ways are connected to responsible decision-making and action (eg people who speak out against popular opinion, and the processes and skills necessary for this).

Societies and cultures

  • 5.8 Identifies and analyses complex social, cultural and environmental issues and strategies, including self-management and land protection, that are important to Aboriginal peoples today (eg the range of perspectives about an issue such as native title or hunting rights).
  • 5.9 Analyses and demonstrates critical understanding of prejudice as a social construction, and acts to counter discrimination through individual attitudes and actions (eg how stereotypes affect various groups, societies and cultures).

Tasmania

Strands and performance criteria at Standard 5 in the Society and History Syllabus of The Tasmanian Curriculum are relevant to the Discovering Democracy unit, ‘Human Rights’.

Standard 5

Strand 1 Identity, relationships and culture

  • Students understand how culture and community shape identity and relationships (eg the effect of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights on national governments).

Strand 2 Democratic values and processes

  • Students understand democratic values and processes in society, government and the law (eg the role of the Australian constitution; how international organisations protect human rights).

Strand 4 Interconnections between systems

  • Students understand social, economic and political systems and the connections between them (eg Stage 13: how laws address iniquity; Stage 14: how some laws can become universal. Also the effectiveness of international organisations, conventions and treaties).

Strand 6 Historical inquiry

  • Students undertake historical inquiries in relation to continuity and change in society (eg events in Australian history that have led to changes in Australian citizenship; government policy regarding Indigenous Australians; people, movements and events that have enhanced civil and political rights for Australians).

Strand 8 Communication

  • Students acquire, critically examine and communicate information.

Victoria

Standards in the domains of Civics and Citizenship and in The Humanities – History within the Victorian Essential Learning Standards are relevant to the Discovering Democracy unit, ‘Human Rights’.

Level 6

Civics and Citizenship

Civic knowledge and understanding

  • Students explain how the Australian constitution affects their lives and human rights issues, both national and international. They analyse how well democratic values are reflected in aspects of the Australian political system (eg the nature and history of human rights and national and international legislation designed to protect those rights; issues such as the inclusion of a Bill of Rights in the constitution; human rights of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders communities and other groups in Australia).


The Humanities – History

Historical knowledge and understanding

  • Students evaluate the impact of colonisation on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and the fight for civil, political and land rights.

Western Australia

The K–10 Society and Environment Syllabus (2007) is consistent with other Department of Education and Curriculum Council frameworks and progress maps. There are developmental progressions of broad understandings in a number of strands relevant to the Discovering Democracy unit, ‘Human Rights’.

Year 9

Culture

Personal, Group and Cultural Identity

  • That cultural practices influence identity (eg conflict within and between groups can be the result of different perspectives on individual rights and responsibilities).
  • National identity (eg Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture has been influenced by the pursuit of citizenship rights – 1962 right to vote at federal level, 1967 Referendum, 1992 Mabo High Court ruling, 1997 National Sorry Day, 2000 Walk for Reconciliation).


Time, Continuity and Change

Understanding the Past

  • The interrelationship between people, events and ideas (eg historical recollections reflect a range of people and their perspectives in different contexts).


Natural and Social Systems

Political and Legal Systems

  • The elements and processes of government and governance (eg the constitution protects civic components of a democracy, which provides a voice for people and possible collective action).
  • The elements and processes of law making and law enforcement (eg the way laws are created, amended and interpreted through parliament, courts, constitutions and civic action; law making is influenced by debate inside and outside parliament; Australia is a signatory to a range of international agreements that influence Australian law).

Year 10

Culture

Cohesion and Diversity

  • That cultural groups are both cohesive and diverse and change over time (eg ideas that have influenced cultural practices and change include universal human rights, social justice, global citizenship).


Time, Continuity and Change

Understanding the Past

  • The interrelationship between people, events and ideas (eg interpretations of the significance of people, events and ideas/movements varies with the time, place and cultural perspective).


Natural and Social Systems

Political and Legal Systems

  • The elements and processes of government and governance (eg values that form the basis of Australia’s representative democracy have evolved over time).
  • The elements and processes of law making and law enforcement (eg law-making processes in Australia have become more representative over time – colonial law to federal law; laws protect human rights and responsibilities in Australia; the role of international organisations in protecting human rights).
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